Threads: Fur, Fabric and Fashion in Quebec

Threads: Fur, Fabric and Fashion in Quebec is now available online. Click the link to hear the 1-hour holiday special.

Like Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver, many cities in the province of Quebec have a rich history of textile production. From the first days of the fur trade, to the bustling factories, all the way to today’s innovative fashion, clothing drove the economies of cities like Montreal, Quebec City, and Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. But change has been tough on the industry. On Threads, we take a look at what remains from over a century of making clothing in this part of the country.

Photos of Harricana's atelier in Montreal. Tune in to CBC Radio One, from 5 to 6 pm on December 26th to hear more about designer Mariouche Gagn√© and the people who help her make new innovative clothing and accessories, all from recycled fur coats.¬†

CBC Radio One - Stream Online

If you’re out of the country for the holidays, you can still tune in to Threads: Fur, Fabric and Fashion in Quebec online. Just follow the link and click “listen live.” December 26th, from 5 to 6 pm.

(via CBC.ca | Quebec AM | Threads)
Industrial mills were the backbone of many towns across the province of Quebec in the 19th century, but working there often meant back-breaking labour with very little pay. Quebec AM’s Julia Caron visited one of those former mills, the Montreal Cotton Company in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Quebec.Christian Fortin works with MUSO , which works to preserve the history of that mill. He gave us a tour, and tells us how workers rights were won behind weaving looms, and what remains of those impressive brick buildings today.
Click the photo to hear the story.

(via CBC.ca | Quebec AM | Threads)

Industrial mills were the backbone of many towns across the province of Quebec in the 19th century, but working there often meant back-breaking labour with very little pay. Quebec AM’s Julia Caron visited one of those former mills, the Montreal Cotton Company in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Quebec.

Christian Fortin works with MUSO , which works to preserve the history of that mill. He gave us a tour, and tells us how workers rights were won behind weaving looms, and what remains of those impressive brick buildings today.

Click the photo to hear the story.

Threads: Fur, Fabric and Fashion in Quebec is a special holiday program produced by some of our team members here in Quebec City. We look at some of the major lines of history in the clothing industry in this province, and look at what has survived through decades and decades of change. One of the guests on the program is Pierre Anctil. He is an historian who has specialized in the history of Jewish people in Montreal and the immigration experience. Here is part of our conversation on the defining role that Jewish people played in the clothing industry, which was also known as the schmatte business. Click the photo to hear that conversation.

Threads: Fur, Fabric and Fashion in Quebec is a special holiday program produced by some of our team members here in Quebec City. We look at some of the major lines of history in the clothing industry in this province, and look at what has survived through decades and decades of change.

One of the guests on the program is Pierre Anctil. He is an historian who has specialized in the history of Jewish people in Montreal and the immigration experience. Here is part of our conversation on the defining role that Jewish people played in the clothing industry, which was also known as the schmatte business. Click the photo to hear that conversation.